Select Page

For the Love of It

Couped up and locked down now for over year, having recycled old photos and memories in an ineffectual effort to assuage the primal need to move about, cleaned and tidied, rearranged and repurposed my enclosure still desperately screams GET OUT.

Read MoreDonate Now

ABOUT THE FLIGHT

An amazing journey awaits…

Couped up and locked down now for over a year, having recycled old photos and memories in an ineffectual effort to assuage the primal need to move about, cleaned and tidied, rearranged and repurposed my enclosure still desperately screams GET OUT.  So if by quirk of fate opportunity to help deliver an old biplane from the Pacific to the Mississippi presents, could you say no?  Destiny manifests adventures too grand to let slip by.  So you say YES and don’t sweat the details (well you try).

Of all planes, biplanes hallmark before times and it seems before times are wanted more now than anything.  But can history impart clearly what lay ahead?  Gone are the 1943 Navy recruits that once trained in this Boeing-Stearman; gone are many of its civilian joy riders; gone are crop dusters confident in the sturdy airframe.  Gone are the generations before plane travel with native lands laying west.  From Camp Dubois to Fort Clatsop, a storied Corps of Discovery took 448 days to reach Lemhi Pass then merely four months to descend to the Pacific.  Hope is that this revitalized 78-year-old can backtrack the route, all the while soaring youthful imaginations about mighty rivers, and mountains, bear and bison, Lakota and Shoshone.  With “progress,” like before, weather dependent.

One American pilot who initially trained in a Stearman was Dr. W. Hardy Hendren, past President of the American Pediatric Surgical Association.  Called a “healer” by his patients and their families, Dr. Hendren, through the APSA, helped foster scientific, clinical and educational endeavors promoting excellence in children’s healthcare and changing life trajectories for thousands.  In the spirit of new trajectories, look back and ask, are we now, over a year later, where we thought we’d be?  So maybe navigating an old bird on perilous flight over the Rockies can be a worthy effort and lend itself to future hopes and dreams.

Tell me, what makes an effort worthy?  I can say, now with more hair in my ears, it’s thriving children and grandchildren – joyful sons and daughers with great dreams for a bright future and memories of a cherished past.

To raise visibility of the APSA Foundation, Pilot and APSA Secretary Dr. Max Langham, and his brother and co-pilot Sam Langham, will retrace parts of the famous Lewis and Clark trail from the Pacific to the Mississippi, in a newly refurbished 1943 Boeing-Stearman open biplane to raise money for the APSA Foundation.

Follow their many adventures and many scenic stops along the way while learning more about the mission of the American Pediatric Surgical Association Foundation (APSAF) with your tax-deductible donation of any amount.  100% of the proceeds after administrative costs goes directly to research to improve the lives of children with birth defects, cancer and life-threatening injuries, all possible through the Jay Grosfeld MD Scholar Grant.  Many of our grant recipients have gone on to secure bigger grants based on the research that started with the Foundation Scholarship funds, leading to ground breaking advancements in pediatric surgical care. Read their testimonials here.

The APSAF mission is to fund research that benefits all our pediatric surgeons, and ultimately, all children.

No donation is too small and every dollar counts.  Please consider making a donation today.  Give what you can and help save a lifetime.

#Barnstorming2021

#Savinglifetimes

@APSAFoundation

FLIGHT STOPS